81 km north of Damascus; 8 km south west of Nabk, Yabrud lies in a fertile pocket in the edge of the forbidding terrain of the Anti-Lebanon and has evidence of settlement going back tens of thousands of years. It once formed part of the domains of Agrippa II, perhaps ceded to him as part of the Tetrarchy of Lysanias by Claudius in AD 53. it was the seat of a bishop in the early Christian period. The Greek Catholic of Constantine and Helen seems to have been built largely with elements of the former Temple of Jupiter. The worship of Jupiter in his local form seems to have achieved wider fame and an altar to Malekiabrudis has been unearthed in Rome. The church contains a good collection of icons. The bases of three Roman columns can be seen to the south. Other remains, perhaps of a temple, are found on the tell to the north, looking out over the Anti-Lebanon, and a single monolith tomb lies on the western edge of town.


There are several Roman tombs 3 km to the west, cut into the limestone rock, one with two lions in relief besides the door and eleven carved relief panels. Other rock-cut tombs are found left of the Maalula road.